Classes

The following is a comprehensive of all of my online classes available through Homeschool Connections. All classes are high school unless they specifically say “Middle School.” All classes are one semester long with the exception of those marked with an asterisk*.  Most classes here are available only on recording; a few are being offered live. Please note this page only provides the most basic information about classes; for course materials, homework requirements, availability, pricing, and registration, please visit the Homeschool Connections website.

U.S. History

Modern U.S. History (1865-2000)

Beginning in the ashes of the Civil War, this course takes students through the industrial revolution and into modern America, helping them understand complex events as the rise of American industrialism, the Great Depression, the Cold War, Vietnam War, cultural revolution of the 1960's, America's involvement in the Middle East and much more, highlighting issues of particular interest to Catholics. Includes an optional Honor's Track. 

Early American History (1492-1763)

This course will take students through the formative years of our continent, beginning with the Spanish and Portuguese explorations of the New World, leading up through the settlements of Jamestown, Plymouth, and the Jesuit missions in New France, and culminating in the great war for the continent waged between France and Britain from 1755 to 1763, setting the stage for the American War of Independence one decade later, highlighting specifically the contributions made by Catholics in the settlement of North America.

Revolution, Republic, and Union (1763-1865)

This class will lead students from America's War of Independence to the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, focusing on the concepts of regionalism and nationalism as the United States develops throughout the 19th century, and highlighting the contributions of Catholics to our nation's development.

Contemporary U.S. History (1988-2016)

This final course in Mr. Campbell's U.S. History series follows the fortunes of the United States from its position of unrivaled global supremacy at the end of the Cold War, through the boom of the 90's and into the post-9/11 world. This class will help students understand contemporary national and global events in light of the historic and cultural shifts of the past 25 years.

Middle School U.S. History Part 1 (1492-1847)

Following the outline of the popular From Sea to Shining Sea textbook, Mr. Phillip Campbell guides Middle School students from the European discovery of America, the foundation of the United States, through the Gold Rush and the years leading up to the Civil War.

Middle School U.S. History Part 2 (1847-1990)

Following the outline of the popular From Sea to Shining Sea textbook, Mr. Phillip Campbell picks up from the years before the Civil War and guides Middle School students through the nation's emergence as an industrial power and its role in the pivotal events of the 20th century, leading to the end of the Cold War.

The Great Depression

This four week course will help students understand one of the most pivotal events in American history, the Great Depression. We will examine the development of banking in the United States as a backdrop to the events of 1929, study the Wall Street Crash of October 29th,1929 and its consequences and follow the unfolding of the Depression around the world and the United States' attempt to mitigate the disaster. This class will also lead students in comparing the financial markets of 1929 to those of today and speculate on whether or not another disaster of the magnitude of the Depression could happen again. 

World History

Dawn of History: Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Persia

This foundational course in world history will introduce students to the world's first great civilizations. Focus will be on Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and Persia, but we will also briefly visit ancient Anatolia, Assyria, India and Palestine. Students will learn about the material culture, political history, intellectual life, religious customs and contributions of each society to the advancement of civilization. In addition, ancient religions will be critically examined in their negative elements as perversions of natural law and in their positive elements as preparatio evangelica, preparations for the Gospel.

Middle School Dawn of History: Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Persia

This foundational course in world history will introduce students to the world's first great civilizations. Focus will be on Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and Persia, but we will also briefly visit ancient Anatolia, Assyria, India and Palestine. Students will learn about the material culture, political history, intellectual life, religious customs and contributions of each society to the advancement of civilization. In addition, ancient religions will be critically examined in their negative elements as perversions of natural law and in their positive elements as preparatio evangelica, preparations for the Gospel. Grades 7-8 recommended.

The Ancient World Part One (3100 BC - 331 BC) Middle School

The Ancient World Part 1 will introduce students to the world's first cultures in the Near East and trace the development of civilization through Egypt, Mesopotamia, and the Fertile Crescent. The course will study both the politics and culture of these ancient cultures--including ancient Israel--and will set the stage for the study of Greece and Rome in the second part of the course.

The Ancient World Part Two (1200 BC - 476 AD) Middle School

This course combines Greek and Roman history for a comprehensive study of the classical world, which provided the cultural and political foundation of Christendom.

The Glory of Ancient Greece

 This course will immerse students in the life and thought of the ancient Greeks, the founders of western civilization. The course will trace the history of the Greek peoples from their origins as bronze age warriors through their path to democracy and the ascendancy of the Greek empires under Athens and later Alexander. We will also focus considerably on the contributions of the Greeks to philosophy, politics and architecture and read primary sources from ancient Greek authors like Herodotus, Polybius, Plato and Euripedes.

Middle School Glory of Ancient Greece

 This course will immerse students in the life and thought of the ancient Greeks, the founders of western civilization. The course will trace the history of the Greek peoples from their origins as bronze age warriors through their path to democracy and the ascendancy of the Greek empires under Athens and later Alexander. We will also focus considerably on the contributions of the Greeks to philosophy, politics and architecture.

Life and Times of the Ancient Romans

This class traces the origins and development of the Roman people from their birth as an iron age tribe on the banks of the Tiber to their emergence as a world empire. Besides conventional history, the course will also look at the cultural life of the Romans (religion, art, literature) as well as show how the early Church was born out of the Roman milieu of the first, second and third centuries. Towards the last few weeks, Roman history and Church history fuse together as the world transitions from Rome to the Middle Ages.

Christ and Caesar

This course will guide students through the history of the ancient world from Israel through the conversion of Rome with an emphasis on how the cultures of the classical world set the stage for the coming of Christ. Particular focus will be on ancient Persia, Greece, and Rome. Students will also study the characteristics of the Early Church and follow the growth of Christianity through the Roman persecutions to the conversion of Constantine. The course will follow closely the outline in Dr. Warren Carroll's book The Founding of Christendom.

Middle School Life and Times of the Ancient Romans

This class traces the origins and development of the Roman people from their birth as an iron age tribe on the banks of the Tiber to their emergence as a world empire. Besides conventional history, the course will also look at the cultural life of the Romans (religion, art, literature) as well as show how the early Church was born out of the Roman culture of the first, second and third centuries. Towards the last few weeks, Roman history and Church history fuse together as the world transitions from Rome to the Middle Ages.

The History of Byzantium

This course will acquaint students with a basic introduction to the political and cultural history of the Byzantine Empire. Major dates, persons, battles, and events will all be covered, as well as important cultural and religious ideas. This course will help students better understand the Christian heritage of the east and Byzantium's continuing influence on Christendom. Uses Dr. Warren Treadgold's A Concise History of Byzantium.

The Catholic Middle Ages

This course studies the Middle Ages from a perspective of the contributions of the Catholic religion to the cultural, political, intellectual, and artistic life of the Middle Ages. This is not a comprehensive political medieval history course, but rather a religious history course on the development of Catholicism throughout the medieval era.

Middle School Medieval History

Middle School Medieval History provides a comprehensive overview of the European Middle Ages. Beginning with the Fall of Rome in the 5th century, this course will guide students through the formative events of the Middle Ages up until the dawn of the Renaissance. The course will cover important political developments, as well as cultural trends, literature, and interesting personalities of the period. Special consideration will be given to the influence of the Catholic Church on the formation of medieval life.

Medicine, Technology, and Invention in the Middle Ages (Middle School)

Medicine, Invention, and Technology in the Middle Ages is a fresh look at medieval history through the lens of science. Too often the medieval period is depicted as one of ignorance, superstition, and technological backwardness. This class will acquaint students with many valuable scientific advances of the Middle Ages and demonstrate that the medieval era was actually a time of dynamic discovery and innovation.

Age of Faith: Medieval History (313-732)

Age of Faith focuses on the formative period of the Middle Ages, from the Edict of Milan to the defeat of the Muslim armies at Tours. Students will learn how the Roman Empire morphed into the kingdoms of medieval Europe, how the Catholic Church helped shape the development of these kingdoms, and about the most prominent men, women, and saints who shaped the culture.

City of God: The High Middle Ages (732-1217)

“The City of God: the High Middle Ages” is the continuation to “Age of Faith.” This course will give students an extremely in depth study of the full flowering of medieval civilization during the period known as the High Middle Ages. Our class will study the politics, ideology, art, and literature of medieval Europe from the 8th-13th centuries.

The Rending of Christendom (1415-1648)

High school students will analyze the causes and outcomes of the Protestant Revolt and will get an in-depth analysis of the important personalities of the period, coupled with a philosophical explication of their varied ideologies; a Catholic apologetic to Protestant doctrines will also be present throughout the series. We will begin by looking at the precursors to the Revolt, beginning in the aftermath of the Western Schism, and will end with the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 at the end of the last of the religious wars. There will also be an emphasis on the importance of the "Counter-Reformation" within the Catholic Church and how it shaped Catholic identity for the succeeding centuries. 

Early Modern Europe (1648-1789)

As Europe recovers from the age of the religious wars, advances in science and the opening up of the New World will lead to new challenges that will first strain and then finally break the old order of Christendom and lead to the emergence of the modern world.

Modern European History (1789-1991)

This class will acquaint students with the people, movements and events that have contributed to the formation of Modern Europe, defined as the period of the French Revolution to the present. Economic, political, military and ideological trends will be examined with an aim of helping students understand the problems of contemporary Europe and those areas once under European control.

Fracturing of the Middle East: The Ottoman Empire to ISIS

Beginning with the closing days of the Ottoman Empire, students will learn how imperialism, nationalism, and other movements shaped the formation of the contemporary Middle East, with the goal of giving students a greater understanding of the current situation in this volatile part of the world.

Revolution: The Progress of Liberalism

Philosophy, but also part history, this course introduces students to the most influential thinkers and philosophical systems of modernity. The course evaluates each system in light of Christian revelation and help students to see the connection between these philosophies and the contemporary world. Note: This class can alternately be classes as philosophy.

The History of Latin America

Americans routinely hear about problems all over the globe, but seldom do we have the historical hindsight to understand the origin of these conflicts. In The History of Latin America, students will survey of the history and culture of Central and South America, from the Spanish and Portuguese colonial period through the age of the revolutions and into the region's troubled modern period. Focus will be on South and Central America but will also touch on the Caribbean with an emphasis on illustrating how the region's past relates to its modern character.

Archaeology

Archaeology of the Ancient World

This course will introduce students to the basic concepts of archaeology, one of the most important disciplines in the study of history. Archaeological principles will be discussed and demonstrated in case studies of some of the world's most famous ancient sites. Students will put their learning to work by writing a paper on an archaeological site of their choosing.

Archaeological Survey of the Old and New Testaments

This class will use the chronology of biblical history to acquaint students with some of the most important archaeological sites of the Holy Land. The content of this class will be based on four interrelated components:[1] Geography: Instruction on the geography of the Holy Land and the greater Middle East [2] Archaeology: An introduction to the principles of basic archaeological methodology in theory and practice [3] Apologetics: Demonstrations of how archaeological research has generally confirmed the biblical narratives [4] History: Using the schema of salvation history as a pattern through which to learn about geography and archaeology.

Geography

Physical Geography

This course will teach students about the surface of the planet Earth. Students learn how Earth's natural systems interact and how to classify the different physical attributes of our planet.

Logic

Introduction to Formal Logic: Thinking with Excellence

This intensive 14-week course will introduce students to the principles of formal logic as presented in the book Traditional Logic: Introduction to Formal Logic by Memoria Press. The aim of formal logic is to teach students how to think properly, focusing on the consistency and process of argumentation (the content of argumentation will be covered in material logic).

Economics

Economics as if People Matter

This class is geared toward providing young people with a holistic approach towards economic principles based on six objectives: (1) introducing students to basic economic principles such as supply and demand, competition, etc. (2) studying the lives and thoughts of eminent economists (3) introducing principles of personal financial management (budgeting, frugality, etc.) (4) looking at economic problems through a Catholic perspective (5) critically examining current economic problems.

Introduction to Catholic Social Teaching*

This four week course provides an exceptional introduction to the Church's social teaching on man, economy and the state, studying the benefits and pitfalls of the modern economy through the lens of Catholic Tradition.

Miscellaneous

Twelve Inventions that Revolutionized the World

This class will look at the development of twelve of the world's most revolutionary inventions, focusing not only on their mechanical development but on how they changed culture and altered the way man views his place in the cosmos. Man's capacity to invent is a result of his being made in the image of God, the original Creator. This class explores the creative capacity of mankind and how man has shaped and reshaped his own self-understanding through his inventions, beginning with the alphabet and going all the way up to the Internet.

Understanding the Second Vatican Council*

This four session course will guide students through the history of the tumultuous years surrounding the Second Vatican Council. We will study the important events and persons of the Conciliar years and dig into the sixteen documents promulgated by the Council, including Lumen Gentium, Sacrosanctum Concilium, Gaudium et Spes, Nostra Aetete and Dei Verbum

Computer Skills for Teens: Introduction to Power Point*

Phillip Campbell introduces students to the popular MS PowerPoint program and teaches students how to utilize this excellent resource to make engaging presentations. We’ll also learn about copyright infringement and how to find free photos. Four class sessions.

Foundations of Christian Historiography*

Foundations of Christian Historiography explores the discipline of history from a Christian worldview. This course will educate students in the various ways people have viewed history throughout the ages, discuss the importance of retaining a Christian framework in our pursuit of historical studies, and train students to see subtle (or not so subtle) anti-Christian presuppositions in popular portrayals of historic events. Students will also learn how to prepare and draft research papers on historical topics, including how to utilize source material and cite sources. This class is essential for anyone interested in studying history at the college level and will be helpful for all Catholics, for whom history, tradition and theology are so tightly interwoven.